Thursday, 15 March 2018

Interview with Kwen D Griffeth, author of Shadow of the Moon


Now available to purchase on Amazon is the fantasy/murder/romance Shadow of the Moon, book one in the Shadow Series, by Kwen D. Griffeth






The author has taken a few minutes from his busy schedule to talk about his newest book.

When did you become interested in storytelling?

I was 14 and I read For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway for the first time. He took a farm boy from Idaho to the Spanish Civil War and allowed me to fall in love for the first time. I wanted the ability he had.

What was your first book/story published?

My first book published was Dear Emma. It is a novella about a small girl whose mother puts notes in her lunch box before sending her to school. The mother is killed in a car wreck, but the notes, from time to time, still arrive.

What inspired you to write Shadow of the Moon?

I read a story about a female werewolf written by a well-known author and I didn’t like the way the werewolf was portrayed. In human form, the character was intelligent, tough, determined and educated. When forced to shift shapes, she became little more than a wild dog chasing rabbits through the forest. I did hours of research on werewolves and the society of wolves. I wanted to develop a more complete character.

What character in Shadow of the Moon is the most/least like you, and in what ways?

I would most be like Detective Gerald Meeker, NYPD. He is a 30-year veteran of the NYPD and he has investigated crimes for most of those years. I’m as old as Meeker, a grandfather like Meeker and I was a police officer. I hope I have a sense of humor like his as well.

What is your favorite part in Shadow of the Moon?

Not so much a part, but a character. I enjoyed writing about Miranda. Miranda is the protagonist’s niece as well as his assistant. She is smart, sexy, red-headed with long legs and she has a touch of rebellion in her against all things structured. She loves to drive her Miata convertible as fast as she can and when another character asks if she’s worried about getting a ticket, Miranda says, “What traffic cop is going to ticket me?”

She’s also a full werewolf and everything does not turn out right for her. She displays a deep character and courage later in the book.

What was the hardest part to write?

Writing a werewolf book requires a certain amount of violence. Which means, there is going to be blood. I was extremely cautious when writing those parts. The werewolf is dangerous and ruthless. I wanted the killing scenes to display that side of the creature, but not derail the story which is much fuller than just that small part of their character.

What would your ideal career be, if you couldn't be an author?

I was a police officer for a number of years and career military. Both were ideal at the time. I am reaching an age where if I couldn’t write I’d have to go fishing. Something I’m not very good at, so I work hard on my books.

Do you read reviews of your books? If so, do you pay any attention to them, or let them influence your writing?

I track the review numbers as certain marketing opportunities avail themselves based on numbers. I actively seek reviews for that reason, but I don’t allow myself to get too excited about the good ones nor bummed about the bad. I focus on writing the best I can but I know not every reader will like my work.

What well-known writers do you admire most?

Stephen King, Sue Grafton, Nora Roberts (J D Robb), John Grisham

Do you have any other books/stories in the works?

Yes, just yesterday I finished 2nd draft of book 3 in my Nate and Clare series. I am starting book 2 in the Shadow series, (Reflections of the Moon). I also have a historical fiction series and will write book 4 later this year.




About the Author


Winner of Readers' Favorite Silver Award for Historical Fiction/Western, Kwen knew he wanted to be a writer when he was fourteen years old. He felt the urge when he finished Earnest Hemingway’s masterpiece “For Whom The Bell Tolls.” The story touched him in a way no other book ever had. It transported a kid born and raised on a farm and ranch in Idaho to the mountains of Spain. It took him back in time forty years to witness the Spanish Civil War. Kwen knew he wanted to share that wonder with other people.

John Lennon said, “Life is what happens while you make other plans.” While Kwen lived a full and varied life, his dream of writing remained in the back of his mind.

Finally, in 2012, he wrote a novella named Dear Emma. He self-published through Amazon and asked people to read it. “The best way to see if I can write is to let people check it out,” he said. Like it, they did. Currently, Dear Emma enjoys a 4.8 out of 5 stars rating on Amazon.

Often asked what genre he writes, Kwen replies he writes stories about people and uses the genre that best fits the story. “I think of the genre, or setting as another character that interacts to help tell the story,” he says.

His most often received and constant comment is how real his characters seem. Upon the completion of his historical fiction trilogy Sam and Laura books, a reader telephoned Kwen and directed him to write more stories about the couple. When asked why the reader was so adamant about more stories, he replied he “wasn’t ready to tell Sam and Laura good bye yet.”

Kwen considers that comment one of his highest compliments.

Kwen’s books are getting some attention from the literary community. The Law of Moses, the Silver Award winner from Readers' Favorite, and The Tenth Nail both received the Gold Award from Literary Titan Book Review. In addition, The Law of Moses was awarded five 5 Star Reviews from the reviewers of Readers' Favorite.

Kwen’s books are available in several formats; e-Book, paperback, and audio. He invites you to check his writings out. Who knows? He might become your next favorite author.

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